Sunday, 2 December 2012

A LOOK INSIDE : YOSI MESSIAH - last show of the year


 YOSI MESSIAH  ||  Q&A  || DECEMBER 2012

 


Can you give us some background to how you became a visual artist?
My first memories are from age 7 where I was fascinated with cartoons. I would sit in front of the black and white TV and draw the characters. My mind would be racing with ideas on what colours to use while drawing. Still at an early age, in all forms of creativity, I would use my hands and imagination to express myself.

When first arriving in Australia I was in awe of the beauty of the landscape and light whilst traveling. I settled in Sydney where I started a jewelry business allowing me to use stones to translate this beauty and express these colours into wearable art. 


When did you start, why did you start?
While still working with Jewellery I found the need to expand my artistic process and the need to express myself on a larger scale.
It was in 1996 I started my official fine art studies at Julian Ashton School of Art and then with Sydney based artist Charlie Shead.


Where do you get your inspiration for each work from?
I find inspiration in all forms of life - be it the city and its fascinating shapes, in nature with its beauty and freedom, or looking back at the rich tapestry of history. Still I'm amazed how colour, texture and form are such a big part of my life.


Other artists that inspire you?  - Do they change overtime/ year to year?
I have found inspiration in artist such as Aida Tomescu, Michael Johnson, Michal Cusack, Adam Cullen and Fred Williams, along with the old masters.
Like Nature these inspirations change and every year I discover new artists from all form that inspire me.


Where do you paint and what is your ideal routine/ daytime… or night owl
I paint in my studio and am defiantly a day person; I find that this is when I can work with the most energy.


What is your painting process, colours, layers and movement seem to be key processes, can you tell us about this?
My painting process is very energetic and labor intensive. In this body of work ‘Colour Spill’ there are four main elements

Be it the starkness of white or the vibrancy of a colour, establishing the background is the first process. The second is what I call the ‘action’ process, layering colours, mixing mediums of oils and varnishes on the surface creating shape and form. What’s considered as the core or heart of the work.
Process three is where the movement and expressive line work comes in. Fluid paint is put above the colourful shapes below; creating a sense of vibration.
The finale stage is where all my early training comes through. Using a small brush I create marks that allows the symphony to start and bring all the stages together.


How did you arrive at the title of this current show?
'Colour Spill' is reflective of the paint that flows and moves on the canvas.


View exhibition


Yosi Messiah‘s ‘Colour Spill’ is on display from 1-12 December at Richard Martin Art, 
98 Holdsworth Street, Woollahra.  Enquiries 9327 6525.




Wednesday, 17 October 2012

A LOOK INSIDE : MIA OATLEY



Mia Oatley  ||  Q&A  || October 2012
 
Image: Billy Plummer - Life in the Bubble
 
Can you give us some background to how you became a visual artist?

One of my first memories is of paintings with my Dad at 2 when my Mum was in hospital giving birth to my sister. My Dad taught me how to draw, and paint, and took me to all of the shows, and museums worth seeing. Our house was filled with artist friends, great books, and my Dad's garage where he welded giant sculptures. Art was all around me; I loved it from the beginning.
As a child art was something that I could loose myself in, something that I was good at, it also represented family.

Other artists that inspire you? - Do they change overtime/ year to year?

I'm inspired by many different artists, from Matisse, Monet, Rodin, Rembrandt, Ines, to Warhol, Basquiat, and Bacon and living artists such as Dumas, Doig,
Hockney, and photographers Bill Henson, and Nan Goldin. Basically I'm attracted to figurative work. People are what most interest me.

Where do you get your inspiration for each work?

I get my inspiration from Life! Books, magazines, people, design, furniture, The urban landscape, nature, conversations, films, put it into a big mixing pot, and let something happen on the canvas!

Where do you paint and what is your ideal routine/ daytime… or night owl

Daytime

How did you arrive at the title of this current show?

I called the show Venus and Me, because, my exhibition is about my relationship to Venus and everything that she represents, love, beauty, nature, sexuality, and sensuality.

What is your painting process; paint application and colour seem to be a key process, can you tell us about this?

Colour is really important to me. I pick up ideas everywhere. I use a lot of different materials to make the paint surfaces to bounce off each other, like enamel, against a matt, or built up oil paint. There isn't a real process as to how I go about it. What works stays, what doesn't is brutally painted over, hence the layered look, which people have commented on, which is more about me changing gears, and making different decisions in my work.


Christina
mixed media on canvas
91 x 76 cm


 




Saturday, 13 October 2012

ON NOW . . .


click on the links below to view mia's show and to read 
blogs, editorial and interviews on mia oatley






BELL | October/November Issue | Mia Oatley

                   BELL, October/November Issue 2012, Bell Inbox

  Mia Oatley
Venus & Me

13 - 24 October

            Artist statement:
"Focusing on the desire, sensuality and beauty of the female nude I've created a series of mixed media paintings and drawings. I'm interested in my female subjects as a whole. Their dreams, aspirations, and desires, this enables me to rip beneath their surface image, and express on canvas how I see them, as well as providing a medium through which to express my own sexuality. The women emerge from a lush terrain. Languid visions from a sensual Utopia. Inspired by the goddess Venus and the powerful metaphors of love, beauty, and nature ‘Venus & Me’ explores the collective thread of women's secret desires".        Mia Oatley, 2012





View Exhibition @ Richard Martin Art





Saturday, 22 September 2012

NOW SHOWING


Andrew Baines  ||  Q&A  || September 2012



Can you give us some background to how you became a visual artist?
I have always wanted be a visual artist from a very young age and tried to chase my dream after leaving school by I attending the SA school of art part-time and doing commercial art during the day but I became sidelined by commercial art and the need to survive.  My commercial work was very successful and took a lot of soul searching to let go of... I knew eventually I would have to, if I wanted to chase my initial dream. In my early 30s I took the plunge and have never looked back!

When did you start, why did you start?
In my early 30s, I gave up my commercial art cold turkey and through everything into my visual art! It took several years of struggle before I got to a point where I could survive comfortably.

Other artists that inspire you?  - Do they change overtime/ year to year?
The obvious inspirations are Magritte, Jeffery Smart and artists like Warhol & Dali due to their incredible self promotion abilities! Every year I discover new artists that inspire me...not only visual but street artists, musical & commercial

Where do you get your inspiration for each work from?
Nearly 50 years of sweat and tears

Where do you paint and what is your ideal routine/ daytime… or night owl
I wake up every morning at 6am and head straight out into my backyard studio, where I paint until 3pm. I then go on the computer for an hour or so and market myself, contact people, organise future installations, research. After this I read philosophy and auto biographies for a short time before heading in front of the box, where I channel surf the TV, trying to absorb the global culture for inspiration! And every second morning I either walk or run along my beach.

How did you arrive at the title of this current show?
“Museum of my Mind” is a broad title for just about any concept I’m working on!

What is your painting process, shadows / lighting and perspective seem to be a key process, can you tell us about this?
I love the contrast between light and dark, and the visual and emotional impact shadows have in helping to convey a mood or concept. I begin with my darkest colours then continue to highlight until I’m happy with the mood.







 View Exhibition:

Thursday, 23 August 2012

Beachgoers drop pants in the name of art

NEW GALLERY ARTIST || ANDREW BAINES 

South Australian artist Andrew Baines photographed people reading newspapers on the toilet for his latest surreal human installation at Adelaide's Henley Beach.

Among his muses, who were dressed up in suits and bowler hats for the occasion, was former immigration minister Amanda Vanstone and Adelaide radio personality Bob Francis.

Some may have thought it was toilet humour but the message was political – the toilet facilities at the popular beach are substandard and need upgrading.

Baines is well known for this type of art.

He has previously held similar events at St Kilda beach, in Melbourne, and Manly beach in Sydney.

Andrew's New exhibition 'Museum of the Mind' will be on display in the gallery 22 September - 10 October

Beachgoers drop pants in the name of art

Thursday, 31 May 2012

Up Next . . .


Scott McDougall  ||  Q&A  || FADING ELEGANCE - Visions of Cuba


Can you give us some background to how you became a visual artist?
It’s in the blood! Always the artist, from as far back as I can remember.
I was the kid in primary school that the teacher always called to draw something on the blackboard.


When did you start, why did you start?
My dad was a terrific hobby painter and always encouraged me to paint and draw. He always had something constructive to say to help me improve my work.
I had a natural ability and simply love to paint and draw. It was the subject I could really excel in.


Other artists that inspire you?  - Do they change overtime/ year to year?
Vermeer and Caravaggio always, and Chuck Close and Estes in my art college years.


Where do you get your inspiration for each work from?
Inspiration is never hard, I’m surrounded by colour and textures. The real problem is finding enough time to paint everything I want too. I love urban scenery and architecture and travel the world every year seeking imagery I can use to create small narratives on my canvasses. It is an exciting challenge, composing an image from drawings, photos and ideas from some half remembered vignette.


Where do you paint and what is your ideal routine/ daytime… or night owl
Home studio and I’m definitely a morning painter. Without interruption I can get on a roll and suddenly find it dark outside my studio window…with no memory of the passing of time. My wife says I go to Scottie land!


How did you arrive at the title of this current show?
I have had a couple of trips to Cuba and I am fascinated with this small island country, cut off from the rest of the world since the Cuban missile crises of the 1960’s. It has been locked in another time, and it’s not often anyone gets a chance to see something so unique. The architecture is beautiful, but crumbling before your eyes. The people of Cuba are beautiful and so spirited, it is hard to believe they can maintain their strength through so many years of hardship and economic depression. I stay with families when I travel and hear, first hand, their stories of revolution, poverty and passion. I wanted to capture some of this on canvas - my works are a record of a time that is about to change, and I fear, change too fast. I hope it will be a change for the better, a change that will improve the lives of all Cuban people


What is your painting process, atmosphere and colour seems to be a key process, can you tell us about this?
I trawl through my images looking for the right ingredients, scenes with great colours and textures and some kind of narrative I can lose myself in. I shift images around, delete some parts, add others, boost colours, mute others, until I have created a composition I’m happy with. I find I can only concentrate on one painting at a time. I need to give each painting my complete focus till that last brush stroke is applied.





 View Exhibition:



Tuesday, 29 May 2012

ARTISTS HEAD SOUTH FOR WINTER


 



 Richard Martin Art, in collaboration with the Milk Factory Gallery, Bowral presents


A selection of award winning gallery artists from Richard Martin Art in Sydney will have their work on show from 9 - 27 June 2012.  The theme is Winter when the southern highlands comes into its own. Artists include Melissa Egan, Peter Hickey, Richard Allen, Diana Watson, Gordon Richards, Belynda Henry, Mitchell Kelly, Craig Handley Yvonne Studdert and sculpture by Julie Haseler Reilly and Stephen Glassborow.

Artists will be present when Richard Martin opens the exhibition at

Wednesday, 9 May 2012


DIANA WATSON  ||  Q&A  || ELYSIUM 2012

We caught up with Diana for a chat and to find out what inspires and what makes her tick.



  (click on above image to view exhibition)


Can you give us some background to how you became a visual artist?
As far back as I can remember.

When did you start, why did you start?
Someone very wisely told me, a woman needs another passion in her life apart from family. I am lucky, mine is art.

Other artists that inspire you?  - Do they change overtime/ year to year?

I remain influenced by the old masters.

Where do you get your inspiration for each work from?
It is an evolving process.

Where do you paint and what is your ideal routine/ daytime… or night owl
Always from a studio at home.  When the light is good I work.
How did you arrive at the title of this current show?

Usually it will be something I am reading, but this time it was a very large, glamorous boat that kept sailing past my window.  It is called Elysium [or Paradise] which is exactly where I wanted to be with this body of work.

What is your painting process, symbolism and lighting seems to be key processes, can you tell us about this?
Symbolism is very important in my kind of work.  It is not just about the beauty of nature but also weaves a narrative.  This along with careful lighting creates drama and I hope helps the viewer transport to the paradise called Elysium.








Diana Watson

Elysium

5 May - 23 May

Sunday, 29 April 2012

Julie Haseler Reilly || Q&A || FAT and the SHOW GIRL


Julie Haseler Reilly's new exhibition "FAT and the SHOW GIRL" is now showing at Richard Martin Art until May 2.

We caught up with Julie for a chat and to find out what inspires and what makes her tick.



 
Can you give us some background to how you became a visual artist?I have always been able to make things. My dolls had elaborate cardboard sets. As a child, I made Barbie gowns from sample upholstery and curtain material, begged off local stores and by the age of 12, I could cut patterns for my clothes and large soft toys.  As an adult I have made costumes and hats and props for the theatre.

My father was a dental technician and would give me lumps of wax to play with while waiting for a lift home after school. I became aware of the lost wax process in his laboratory and probably subconsciously avoided anything to do with such a tedious and laborious occupation. Teeth were the only by-products.


When did you start, why did you start?I had satisfied my desire to be a creative person, with acting, singing, writing and dancing. Sculpture just hadn’t occurred to me till late in life. I made portrait busts of my two daughters in 2000 and bronzed them in 2001. I loved them so much I wanted to immortalise them as the 8 and 9 year old girls they were at the time. The process surprised me and made me curious about what else I could do to express myself in the medium. I loved working in clay and wax.
  
Where do you get your inspiration for each work?Watching the news and reading the paper, which I try to avoid as much as possible, is the inspiration for creating my ‘optimistic ‘bodies of work’. Like the Venus of Willendorff, they are a totem of hope for my tribe in our time.

‘Beulah’ - I was trying to create a pear shaped female form and the character of ‘Beulah’ emerged as the improbable athlete and became my signature form.

‘The Pedicure’ began as an extension of Beulah but morphed into her own self. She evolved as I played with the clay. This seems to be my process unless I am doing a life study.

‘Flying Muses’-I am playing with smaller versions of ‘Beulah’ my signature piece.

‘Trapeze’ - Another expression of ‘Beulah.’

‘Euro’- another pear shaped form who emerged as an innocent protecting the last Euro.

‘Fat Tango’ and ‘Big Fat Tango’- I was interested in capturing the passion of the tango and the impact and movement and balance of two large people slamming together. I have been a dancer and am fascinated by small gestures and moments of drama captured in the dance.

‘Beatrice Bush’ - Marquette for street sculpture of famous paper seller in Balmain area.

‘Abundance’ and ‘Prosperity’ - are totems dedicated to engendering the qualities their titles imply. They are Idols of Hope in a world of fear and loathing.
Proserpine Says Yes’ - is my answer to the Heroic Rape sculptures and in particular, Bernini’s the ‘Rape of Proserpina’. I have immortalised her having a freely consenting good time as opposed to being portrayed as the victim. (See attached).

‘Mum’s Watching’ emerged from a nude life study as a figure of protection and watchfulness. I have memories of my mother sitting in the sun like a Max Dupane photograph, ever watchful of her brood in the water. She looks after us all.

‘Fandango’ and ‘Delores’ are both defiant expressions of joy, and fearlessness in the face of reality. They are about confidence and hope.

‘Pole Dancers’ - I wanted to do something clever by suspending bronze figures rather than the usual granite base and thought pole dancers would be a good subject. They are a Marquette for a large-scale work.  My dream location would be the fore court of St Marys Cathedral.

‘Ballet Girls’-Degas

‘Joy’ - I wanted to make a small figure with a lot of movement and energy.

‘Ample’-Defying the notion of modern beauty.

‘Dewi Kewpie’ - I have always admired the Hindu/Animist religious practices of the Balinese people. Giving offerings of flowers, food and incense and simple daily prayers. I am not religious but felt a bit envious of the spiritual practice in my village and a little fraudulent when I did participate at our temple. I decided to create my own stone idol, a spiritual portal for the irreligious.

‘Serene’- Carving in stone is challenging and I wanted to do a figure that was restricted by the size and shape of the block.

‘Peel Me A Grape’- Wanted to make a large reclining female figure in stone.  I made a small clay Marquette first and chose a block of stone that would suit the dimensions of the figure. I wanted an improbably big bottom that would be exaggerated by the smallness of her torso.


Other artists that inspire you?  - Do they change overtime/ year to year?
Bernini, Degas, Rodin, Rubens, Henry Moore, Picasso Bret Whitely will always be inspirational. I try not to look too much at other contemporary sculpture for fear of influence and imitation but I like Henry Moore, Botero and Allan Somerville.
I find inspiration from life, painting, photography and my imagination.
Rubens- Union of Earth and Water  (see images below).

Where do you sculpt and what is your ideal routine/ daytime… or night owl 
I usually work in bursts where I go non-stop from about 10am till I collapse with dehydration and exhaustion at dinnertime. I will do this for several days in a row till I have finished with the clay then I will cover it and look at it again in a few days when my head is clear and my eye refreshed so I can see the faults that I was blind to in the honeymoon period of creativity. Then I ‘improve’ where necessary until I am happy to make a mold.
  
      How did you arrive at the title of this current show -  ‘Fat’ and ‘The Showgirl’? 
      There have been a few pieces that people have suggested express something of the ‘showgirl’ from my past career and FAT (Fabulous . Abundant .Triumphant)was the title of my previous exhibition and some of that work was represented in the current show, hence, ‘Fat and the Showgirl’.


What is your sculpting process, movement and balance seems to be a key process, can you tell us about this?
I have trained as a dancer and my teacher, Keith Bane, focused our attention on the importance of gesture. He developed my eye for balance and form and composition. Stillness is just a brief moment between movements. There is always internal motion and energy even when still. In my sculpture I try to give all my work an internal energy. I also like trying to make heavy look light and creating the illusion of moving weighty flesh in bronze.

The beginning of my process is working with clay or wax.  I usually start with a rough idea but then let the work evolve and find the character as I move the clay or wax about.  I may cast at this stage or make an armature for a larger version.
Life studies are more prescriptive but can be adapted to a narrative later.



Rubens


 Picasso


Brett Whitely



 
‘The Rape of Proserpina’ by Bernini 








Now Showing | Last Days




Wednesday, 14 March 2012

CRAIG HANDLEY || Q&A || Art Month 2012



Craig Handley's new exhibition "mis-cel-la-ne-ous" is now showing at Richard Martin Art. We caught up with him as part of ART MONTH for an artist talk, to find out what inspires him and what makes him tick.

 
Can you give us some background to how you became a visual artist?
Left school and completed a sign writing apprenticeship. Went into animation industry. Have stayed in industry for 20 plus years now


When did you start, why did you start?
Around 2000. Mostly to stave off boredom and to expunge the demons!!


Are there any other artists that inspire you?  - Do they change overtime/ year to year?
John Register (American) Mark Tansey (American) Michael Borremans (Belgian)
Clarice Beckett (Australian)
I’ve drawn endless inspiration from these people for a long time now.


Where do you get your inspiration for each work from?
At around two in the morning usually after a startling dream of some what not or this and that.


Where do you paint and what is your ideal routine/ daytime… or night owl ?
Where and when I can, no routine


How did you arrive at the title of this current show?
Miscellaneous: composed of or containing a variety of things; diversified,
All sorts of qualities, aspects or subjects   


What is your painting process, drawing and graphics seems to be a key process, can you tell us about this?
I collage all sorts of disparate elements together to create an engaging composition all the while looking for markers that spark a memory within the viewer.


What do you think when you look back at early works, how do you feel about them now 12 years on?
Well, I am happy with everything I exhibit, but there are always a few that stand out for sentimental reasons.